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goal setting high bar

Is the Bar too High?

By | Blog, Decision Making, Intuition Basics, Leadership, Teams | No Comments

When it comes to goal-setting, it’s easy to assume that bigger is always better, and that more is always… more. Our pride can rear its head with the notion that there’s no such thing as a bar that’s too high to set for your business goals or life goals. Right?

Wrong.

As a business leader, you have to be willing to sense when a goal is too far out of reach. It can actually hurt company morale and motivation if it’s not grounded in something credible. Leadership depends on having one foot on the ground while raising another into new territory.

An Ungrounded Target

I once worked with a business owner whose business earned $300K in sales over the year. When he sat down to write out his goals for the following year, he put down a new target of $5 billion. While I admired his ambition and drive, I knew that part of my job was to get his leadership and goals grounded in reality.

When I asked him where he got that number from, he simply said that this is the number that came to him and that he thought it was possible. He subscribed to the belief that you can manifest your reality if you really believe in it.

I reframed the conversation around why would he put this level of pressure on himself and his team. Instead, start with a scalable goal. A healthy challenge that inspires others to perform—but not one that is so unreachable that people don’t take it seriously. He felt relief hearing this. He realized he had to find a number he was more connected to—and not a goal that he came up with out of thin air.

Intuition Connects You to Your Goal

How often have we all picked a random target, something that got stuck in our head for whatever reason? In an era of “hustle” and “crush it,” it can be easy to set the bar too high. But this only happens if you abandon your deeper connection to your goals.

It’s crucial to ask yourself why a goal is important for you and whether it aligns with your highest values.

In other words, if your goals are truly grounded to the core of your values and purpose, that’s a business you can literally get behind!

If you want guidance in bringing your leadership team’s collective intuition and intelligence into your strategy and planning for superior decision-making, stay tuned for the next blog post, or reach out to us at info@invisible-edgellc.com.

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Decisive Intuition is available where books are sold on March 1, 2019. Pre-order your copy now on Amazon!

“Snyder shows you not only why building intuitive skills for your leaders and teams are critical for innovation and success, he actually shows you how to do it. This practical and inspiring book will transform your company culture and keep you a step ahead of the marketplace.”

Marshall GoldsmithNew York Times #1 bestselling author, Triggers

 

intuition comfort zone goal setting

Beyond Your Comfort Zone

By | Blog, Decision Making, Intuition Basics, Leadership, Teams | No Comments

Neale Donald Walsh famously said, “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.” If we are always comfortable and doing what’s familiar, then we are not challenging ourselves. We are not growing. We stay in a comfortable, predictable, and stagnant existence.

If you look around at your friends and colleagues, chances are you will see a spectrum of some people who are just trying to ‘get by’ and follow the routine that they know. You will also see others who listen to the beat of a different drum and lean into challenges and new opportunities that stretch them, make them uncomfortable, yet alive.

Comfort AND Growth

In fact, you most likely can see these two polarities at play in your own life: the need to be comfortable and the need to grow. And there is a time and place for both. Yet more often than not, I find that choosing growth is the more fulfilling path.

  • What does life feel like when you are just counting the days to the weekend or the next holiday or vacation?

  • What is it like when you wake up each morning and feel gratitude for making the most out of the day ahead?  

  • Which one of these realities is most true right now?

The great thing about listening to your intuition is that this immediately pulls you out of your comfort zone and into uncharted territory. Listening to your inner guidance provides insights from a different angle. This is literally where the term ‘outside-the-box thinking’ comes from.

Expertise On ‘Pause’

When you are setting goals and planning for your future, sometimes you have to be willing to suspend what you know. And this is one of the hardest things for leaders to do. Putting your expertise on ‘pause’ and opening up to all of the possibilities of this moment is rarely modeled in the boardrooms and team meetings around the globe.

If you or another leader is exemplifying this, you are receiving a valuable gift and a reminder of how to stay fresh and alive in your life, and cultivate a growth mindset for your teams.

One of our passions at Invisible Edge is helping leadership teams and creatives identify and unlock an unproductive mindset and move toward one of growth and possibility. If you have a sense that it’s time for a different conversation than the one you’ve been having, reach out to us at info@invisible-edgellc.com and let’s talk.

________________________________________________________________

Decisive Intuition is available where books are sold on March 1, 2019. Pre-order your copy now on Amazon!

“Snyder shows you not only why building intuitive skills for your leaders and teams are critical for innovation and success, he actually shows you how to do it. This practical and inspiring book will transform your company culture and keep you a step ahead of the marketplace.”

Marshall GoldsmithNew York Times #1 bestselling author, Triggers

 

Facilitating Innovation With Teams Part 4: Disrupting Routine

By | Blog, Innovation, Teams | No Comments

Over these four weeks, we are covering a four-step process on how to inspire your team to think outside the box and contribute to your goals from their intuitive intelligence, resulting in more creativity and innovation. Part 1 we looked at how Leaders Go First. Part 2 focused on building Safety and Trust within your company culture. Part 3 involved encouraging intuitive thinking. Today we focus on disrupting routine and normal ways of thinking.

Disruption

Interrupting typical patterns of thinking and helping your team get out of their heads is an effective way to bring intuition into your company culture. If you keep finding yourself stuck or stagnant on the same problem and see no way around it, disrupt your typical routine or mode of thinking or that of your team’s.

This is where getting outside, stepping away from the computer, engaging in a physical exercise or mindfulness practice can be so helpful to change your brain states and get into more of a flow state where you can access your subconscious creativity and intuition.

Steven Kotler and Jamie Wheal, the founders of the Flow Genome Project, have dedicated themselves to this research and define flow as “optimal states of consciousness where we feel our best and perform our best.” It’s when performers and high achievers describe being “in the zone,” where they are so focused in the moment and the task at-hand, that everything else disappears in the background.

Play

Play is a key disruptor and one that is often lacking in the business context. We accept the value of play as children, but we don’t often appreciate how vital this is to business and decision making as adults, in sparking the creativity, joy, and ingenuity of staff.

One business I’ve worked with brings in improv classes as an option for learning how to intuit the moment and play off of other people in social dynamics. Translating improv classes into business has tremendous upside.

In fact, Chicago’s famous Second City improv troupe has expanded to lead corporate trainings. Business schools at such universities like Duke and Stanford are including improv classes in their curriculum to help future leaders cope with a rapidly changing environment.

They have noticed that their staff leave these classes feeling more confident, think faster, embrace failure more easily, increase awareness, improve listening skills, and learn how to read-out social dynamics and cues which has directly related to their role in the company. By breaking up routine patterns and modes of thinking, you are creating space for individual and collective intuition and genius to flourish. Now let’s look at how to assess the level of intuitive intelligence within your organization and how to make your company culture smarter.

So whether it’s taking your team out of the office for an ‘off-site’ or finding other creative ways to step away from the computer and change up the environment through movement or stillness, disrupting normal ways of thinking allow your team to get out of their conscious mind and into their subconscious, which is the birthplace of creativity and intuition, and allows your team to make faster and more holistic decisions.

For more information on how to facilitate more innovation with your teams, contact us at hello@three-hats.com!

Facilitating Innovation With Teams Part 3: Encouraging Intuitive Thinking

By | Blog, Innovation, Teams | No Comments

Over these four weeks, we are covering a four-step process on how to inspire your team to think outside the box and contribute to your goals from their intuitive intelligence, resulting in more creativity and innovation. Part 1 we looked at how Leaders Go First. Part 2 focused on building Safety and Trust within your company culture. Today we focus on encouraging intuitive thinking from your teams.

Encouraging Intuition

Now that you have established a baseline of safety and trust to take risks on your team or within your company, the next step involves encouraging innovation and creative thinking.

This means that no idea is too crazy or ‘out there.’ For your staff to take risks, they need to feel the freedom and respect that they can fling pasta on the wall and see what sticks. The more you can facilitate a non-judgmental space you will get ideas that you couldn’t have reached on your own.

In fact, you might need to bite your tongue and go last as you let your team take front and center stage with their ideas and possibilities. You will have time to bring in the practical elements like budgets and other constraints later, but for now, let them brainstorm and feed off the collective energy in the room.

Gut Check

If a meeting is running off the tracks, help everyone refocus and have them literally stop, and check-in with their gut. When ideas are swirling around and attention spans are waning, call a time-out and have everyone re-group and check-back in with their own innate intelligence and what they are sensing in the room.

Whenever I’ve paused the normal flow of conversation and invited staff to feel into their gut sense, they almost always know what needs to happen next. They just might require help gaining the courage to take action, or clarify the forty steps to get to their destination.

Personal Time

Igniting intuitive decision making requires a balance between personal, reflective time, as well as bringing everyone together and harnessing the collective wisdom of the group. And as mentioned, the more you become the change that you want to see, the more people will follow your lead.

Whether it’s for five minutes or three hours, personal time well spent is critical. Carving-out solo-time for slowing down, accessing your deeper subconscious mind, and approaching a situation from a fresh perspective is necessary for innovation.

As strategic thinking accesses different parts of our brain, we need that time and space to sink deeper within ourselves and discover what’s waiting for us. This means eliminating distractions, finding a suitable and inspiring environment, and allowing time to focus and go within. It’s also important to encourage staff to make this quality time as well.

Group Dynamics

Once team members have made some time for personal reflection and clarity, it’s incredibly powerful to bring everyone together to brainstorm and discuss strategy. There’s a creative element that only happens in a collective field and people can bounce ideas off of each other.

Staff members who feel included and respected, are willing to give their best and contribute toward the greater good of the team.

For more information on how to facilitate more innovation with your teams, contact us at hello@three-hats.com!

Facilitating Innovation With Teams Part 2: Safety and Trust

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Over these four weeks, we are covering a four-step process on how to inspire your team to think outside the box and contribute to your goals from their intuitive intelligence, resulting in more creativity and innovation. Part 1 we looked at how Leaders Go First. Today we focus on the necessity of building safety and trust inside your company culture.

Safety and Risk

There’s an interesting paradox between risk and safety. In order for a culture or a group of people to take a risk, they have to feel safe. So if you want to encourage risk taking and thinking strategically and creatively outside the box, and even being willing to look like a fool at the meeting for a moonshot idea, there has to be a culture of safety and acceptance for an employee to relax into themselves and share their gifts. 

In fact, Google conducted a two-year study and found that the highest-performing teams had one thing in common: psychological safety. An atmosphere of open communication, respect, and creativity is infectious and directly serves the company as employee participation is encouraged. 

Innovation is not exclusive to high tech companies. It exists in any business with the right mindset. A healthy company culture requires authentic communication about what’s really going on with staff, with customers, and with leadership. Building this level of trust is the basis of creating safety in the workplace and encouraging staff to take risks. If you want outside-the-box solutions or honest feedback at a bare-minimum, a place for open dialogue is necessary.

If staff are ridiculed for their ideas or taunted or humiliated publicly or privately, people will shut down and not come forward with real feedback or creative ideas that might just be the very thing the company needs to hear. Creating safety and trust has to start with the leadership if it’s going to trickle down inside the company culture. There’s always a part of us scanning for safety in our environment, and if we don’t feel it, this will shut-down productivity and innovation.

Leaders and managers who understand the importance of having everyone feel valued and respected, will get more contribution and leadership from staff members. Having your team feel safe to share what needs to be shared without consequence or retaliation, is the most important foundation for creating an innovative and forward-thinking atmosphere. 

For more information on how to facilitate more innovation with your teams, contact us at hello@three-hats.com!

Facilitating Innovation With Teams: Part 1 of 4

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As I write and teach about bringing intuitive intelligence into company cultures for greater decision making, leadership, and innovation, I’m often asked by leaders and managers “How do I get my team to think more innovatively? Over the next four weeks, we’ll cover this four-step process to inspire your team to think outside the box and contribute to your goals from a more creative and intelligent resource within. 

Facilitating Innovation With Teams Part 1: Leaders Go First
 
Leaders set the tone for their company culture. In order for intuitive decision making to integrate into your strategy and activities, it has to start with members of the leadership team respecting and honoring their own intuition first. 

If leaders don’t understand or learn how to decode their own internal signals, they will miss these cues in their environment. This is a skill that needs to be developed over time. It’s a journey. Yet there are more resources than ever to learn the language of your own inner guidance system. You can start by simply asking “what’s my own internal feedback system telling me?” 

When you look back in hindsight at a tough decision you had to make, were there any signals that were speaking to you during the decision-making process? It’s important to start noting and tracking the specific ways that you receive information. This is your superpower. And looking back is the best way to start to decode your own intuitive language.

It is risky for anyone in a company to share a gut sense about business decisions that might be unpopular or seem out-of-nowhere. Leaders put themselves at even greater risk as every decision they make is more scrutinized. Yet for leaders to truly lead, they are required to lean into their own discomfort and be willing to make decisions that might not be well-received or might fail. 
 
The more a leader is willing to break the ice and model the behavior s/he expects to see, the more likely these values will be reflected in the company culture and others will learn that it’s ok to take risks, which is necessary for innovation to take place.

Leaders can foster intuitive decision making if they develop qualities such as receptivity, openness, vulnerability, curiosity, play, emotional intelligence, a willingness to not know, and making time to listen to their inner and outer environment. If they are not a living example of what they want to see on their teams, no one will take them seriously.
 
This is a great time to reflect: are you carving out time for reflective and strategic thinking? Are you facilitating meetings and solo time for thinking outside-the-box and encouraging others to do the same? When people come to you for answers, do you respond with questions that help others dig deeper into their own intuitive solutions? And most importantly, what are you doing to grow these skill sets in order to foster a transformative and innovative company culture?

For more information on how to facilitate more innovation with your teams, contact us at hello@three-hats.com!

Client Story: Daniel Caruana and Wayne Spiteri

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This story was written from the perspectives of Daniel Caruana, Director and CEO, and Wayne Spiteri, COO and Head of Sales, of Danrae Waterproofing.

Our company operates throughout New South Wales, Australia, providing waterproofing and water-related repairs for new construction and remedial buildings in a variety of sectors. Our vision is to become a fully fledged service company with an expansive reach.

We joined Danrae in 2006 to help Lillian and Ron Caruana, the founders of the company, with the workload. It was a great opportunity for us and we were passionate about the business. But the company grew rapidly and there weren’t systems in place to cope with the demand, so it quickly grew beyond our control. We were running out of money and had to let people go because we weren’t making any money either. We tried different coaching programs at first, but those programs only offered quick-fixes—and we didn’t need a quick fix. We needed to get to the root of the problem.

When we finally turned to EMyth and had our first call with our coach, Rick Snyder, there was an instant connection. EMyth was perfect for us because it started with us, what we wanted and the accountability we needed. Our staff wasn’t sure who was responsible for what because we hadn’t clearly communicated with them, and our team wasn’t aware of our vision or the critical numbers of the business. When we brought Rick on as our coach, he recognized the uncertainty about who was really leading the company and where our Leadership Team was going, and he knew how to help.

Working with Daniel, Wayne, Ron and the Leadership Team of Danrae has been an incredible experience for me. I have witnessed each of them face their limitations and trust the coaching process enough to take the risks they needed to take, have the uncomfortable conversations they needed to have and continue to show up as the leaders they truly are.
Rick Snyder, EMyth Coach

Rick made us look in the mirror—showing us where we were getting in our own way—and helped us realize that we needed work boundaries. When you’re coming into a family business, it can be daunting because you’re not sure what to expect. It always felt like there was an elephant in the room. You didn’t want to speak out against an employee because that employee is actually a member of your family. You don’t want to do something at work that will have repercussions back at home, so it was hard for people to step up and say things needed to change. Not speaking up was holding us back. Rick helped us to break out of our family dynamic and get clear about our boundaries.

Now, we actually enjoy going to work. Before, we’d get in at 7:30 a.m. and leave at 5 p.m., feeling drained and like nothing was accomplished. But now, we’re clear about our roles and what we’re working towards. We went from laying people off and not having any profit to having an average net profit of 15-20%.

They have more fun, more profit, a stronger cash position, an inspired company culture and a plan to grow to even greater heights in this coming year. Their hunger and motivation makes coaching a joy.
– Rick Snyder, EMyth Coach

We’re working on bringing in a marketing specialist, breaking out the company into different sections, potentially hiring more staff and improving our delivery this year. Within the next three years, we want to expand into different states across Australia. We are going to be the “go to” company for waterproofing remediation and maintenance in buildings. And beyond that, we hope to create a company that allows its people to achieve their dreams. Through the results of the company, we will give a “line of sight” to where everyone wants to be. Our people have so much potential and we believe our company can unleash it.

Learn more about Danrae Waterproofing

How To Lead Innovative Brainstorming Sessions

By | Blog, Culture, Innovation, Teams | No Comments

This month, we’ve covered the three types of intuition that you can integrate into your company for greater decision making—namely directional, social, and informational intuition. Today we look at how to build intuitive intelligence on your teams during brainstorming sessions for greater innovation and creative thinking.

How do you get your team to think outside the box for fresh solutions to your top challenges? In order to open up a creative space for strategic thinking, you need to interrupt your team’s normal thinking patterns. Here are some steps you can take that lead to powerful results, no matter if you are strategizing a new product launch, goals for the coming year, or how to solve a customer service issue that keeps arising.

#1: Check Phones at the Door

Recent studies have found that participants who had their smartphones with them—even if they were turned off—scored significantly worse on tests of cognitive capacity. And while we might be dumbing ourselves down by over-relying on phones and less on our creative impulses, it is also a distraction from delving deeper into our subconscious mind and the source of our creativity. Sinek and others suggest banning phones from meetings for this very reason.

I have found that in order to facilitate the collective intelligence of your team, you need to eliminate distractions for these types of meetings. And leaving cell phones off is a great place to start.

#2: Create Safety

No idea is stupid in a brainstorming session. In fact, the more that we feel safe to stretch our imaginations, the more room we create for innovation.

Safety is the bedrock of creativity and innovation. People only take risks when they assess that it’s safe to do so. As a manager or facilitator of a brainstorming session, it is imperative to have everyone feel welcome and included in the conversation, and that no contribution will be ridiculed or shamed.

When managers or colleagues put down staff in public, people tend to shut down and learn that it’s not safe to take risks. And innovative thinking is all about risks and thinking outside the norm. So, what do you need to say, do, or model to have everyone feel secure, so that they can access their intuition and subconscious mind for more creative decision making and strategy?  

#3: Leverage Your Team’s Intelligence

Everyone’s different in how they think, approach, and make decisions. Use an assessment such as the Gallup StengthsFinder to helps you figure out everyone’s unique strength on the team. You can work more intuitively as a team once that is in place. Intuition is all about being open. If anything creates barriers or blocks, such as how people learn and take in information, it will block access to their deeper wisdom.

#4 Disrupt the Rational Mind

While critical thinking and reasoning are necessary for analyzing business decisions, one of the missing ingredients in most brainstorming sessions is recognizing the value of the subconscious mind. And the subconscious mind is where our intuition lives. Because the subconscious mind processes information 500,000 x faster than the conscious mind, business leaders who get this understand the value of slowing down, interrupting our normal thinking, and allowing space for intuitive insights to find us.

Business leaders and managers that I work with use creative disruptions to get their teams out of their heads, with amazing results. Such techniques include getting out of the office, going on company retreats, engaging in group activities, juggling, playing games and accessing other creative ways of learning and sharing, physical challenges, mindfulness practices and many other techniques to help staff get into their bodies and deeper brain states.

All of these steps allow team members to access their intuition and bring more insight and bigger-picture thinking into your meetings. For further inquiries on how to deepen your company’s strategic meetings and decision making, contact hello@three-hats.com.